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Philosophy

University Transfer
Social Science Courses

 


20-809-210 TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY (SOCSCI)
Addresses one or more patterns reflecting peoples' use of the earth. Examples of topics include geography of the United States, geography of national parks, and geography of water resources. Specific topics are indicated in the schedule of classes. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-212 WISCONSIN (SOCSCI)
Examines physical and cultural patterns based on the development of physiographic regions. Emphasizes resources, agriculture, climate, economic, and urban development. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-215 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (SOCSCI)
Introduces regional geography of the world. Emphasizes relationships with, and uses of, the physical and economic world. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-216 HUMAN/CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (SOCSCI)
Introduces students to the tools which geographers use to observe, describe, and analyze the world in which we live, with special emphasis on cultures, people, environments, and regions and their interactions. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-217 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (HU)
Introduces fields of philosophy, philosophical reasoning and the history of philosophy. Develops the ability to think, speak, argue and write critically about complex and general issues. Topics vary and may include cross-cultural philosophies, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, logic and critical reasoning, as well as clarification about the roles and philosophy, religion and science. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-220 TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY (HU)
Pursues advanced or specialized philosophy topics in a traditionally structured, independent study or service-learning format. Topics vary each semester. Depending on the structure, requirements and topics are developed in advance by the instructor or by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites vary by special topic. Lecture. 1-3 credits.

20-809-22002 TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY: INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS (HU)
An introduction to world religions including Native American religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and others. The course will study the historical roots of religion and religions as well as the basic tenets or religion(s). It will endeavor to find commonalities and distinguishing characteristics between the religions. It will also ask and attempt to find some answers in scriptures and the writings of adherents to the questions: Why do religions exist? What have people striven for knowledge that apparently transcends experience and rational thought based on experience? What is the knowledge that religions purport to lead us to? Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-225 ETHICS (HU)
Explores contemporary moral problems including animal rights; capital punishment; environmental ethics; euthanasia; job discrimination, sexual harassment and affirmative action; reproductive choices; race and ethnicity; world hunger, and poverty. (Video option requires the student to be a proficient reader and writer.) Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-226 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (HU)
An introduction to environmental ethics. It is primarily aimed at students who have had little or no exposure to the philosophical issues surrounding the problem of Nature. Some of the problems to be discussed are: endangered species, energy and pollution, wilderness, environmental justice, world hunger, immigration and overpopulation, animal rights and corporate obligations regarding the natural environment. The course covers both theoretical approaches and practical applications. Likewise, the course will provide a detailed history and background of the roots and development of our present ecological situation. Lecture. 3 credits

20-809-232 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (SOCSCI)
This course introduces students to the essential features and etiology of various psychological disorders. Students are also introduced to contemporary methods of assessment and treatment using the diagnostic system of the DSM-ITV-TR, and to ways of thinking critically about the diagnosis of psychological disorders from both historical and contemporary perspectives, including socio-cultural considerations of mental illness. Prerequisites: 20-809-251 or permission of instructor. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-245 HUMAN SEXUALITY (SOCSCI)
Surveys of psychology of sexuality including historical, social, and cross-cultural perspectives on sexuality, psychosexual development and the development of intimate relationships across the lifespan, the varieties of sexual experience, attitudes, and values, psychological factors in reproduction and reproductive technology including contraception, conception, pregnancy, and childbirth, sexual problems and treatment, and research methods used to study sexuality. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-250 LIVING WITH DEATH (SOCSCI)
Offers a personal and practical introduction to death awareness founded on the premise that living is incomplete without a full and realistic appraisal of our own dying and of the deaths of those for whom we care. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-251 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY (SOCSCI)
This course surveys the methods, principles, and theories of psychology as they are applied to understanding, predicting, and modifying human behavior. Essential theoretical perspectives, including cognitive, humanistic, socio-cultural, psychodynamic, learning, and biological/evolutionary inform an understanding of key topics in psychology, among which may include the brain and behavior, development, emotion, memory, motivation, personality, psychological disorders, sensation and perception, and thinking and intelligence. At the successful completion of the course, students will be well prepared for more advanced study in the field of contemporary psychology. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-254  EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (SOCSCI)
Explores the psychological theories of development and learning related to education and teaching.  The course covers the unique diversity of students that we teach as well as exceptionalities.  Students examine learning theory and instructional practice as well as issues of motivation and classroom management.  Classroom planning and assessment methods and techniques are evaluated. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-255 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (SOCSCI)
Covers human development and behavior from conception through adolescence, with emphasis on both theories and applications in parenting and other adult-child settings. General Psychology is advised. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-263 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (SOCSCI)
This course examines the influence of others on individual behavior in social settings. Various social problems are examined with regard to aggression, altruism, attitude, attribution, communications, conformity, interpersonal attraction, obedience, prejudice, sex roles, social roles, and values. Prerequisite: 20-809-217 or consent of instructor. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-265 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (SOCSCI)
Pursues advanced or specialized psychology topics in a traditionally structured, independent study or service-learning format. Topics vary each semester. Depending on the structure, requirements and topics are developed in advance by the instructor or by the student in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites vary by special topic. 1-3 credits.

20-809-26501 DIVERSITY IN FILM SPECTATORSHIP (SOCSCI)
Examines film spectatorship as a psychological and social phenomenon that reveals the diversity of human experience by exploring the relationship that movie-viewers have to watching movies. Students will assess the value of various theories of film spectatorship for describing the movie-viewing experience, compare and contrast different approaches for investigating film spectatorship, and consider how psychology and the cinema influence our understanding of social phenomena such as culture and general stereotyping. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-271 INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY (SOCSCI)
Studies of human society, including the individual, culture, and society; social inequality; social institutions, and social change in the modern world. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-272 VALUING DIVERSITY (SOCSCI)
Examines the sociology of minorities, race, social class, age, gender, and sexual orientation, with emphasis on common elements among individuals and groups of people. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-275 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY (SOCSCI)
Examines marriage and family relationships in current American society: preparation for marriage, potential problem areas, family planning, divorce, and reconstituted family roles. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-278 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (SOCSCI)
Pursues advanced or specialized sociology topics in a traditionally structured, independent study or service-learning format. Topics vary each semester. Depending on the structure, requirements and topics are developed in advance by the instructor or by the student in consultation with the instructor. Lecture. 1-3 credits.

20-809-279 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (SOCSCI)
Surveys the major social problems confronting America today, including deviant behavior, inequality, and global social problems. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-283 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (SOCSCI)
Studies the function of culture in satisfying human needs. Addresses basic anthropological principles and methods. Emphasizes non-western cultures. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-287 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (SOCSCI)
Introduces, describes, and analyzes factors which affect the overall performance of the economy. Describes and analyzes the cause and consequences of unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and international trade. Analyzes the role of financial institutions and the Federal Reserve System. Examines current topics, including the U.S. budget deficit, the U.S. trade deficit, monetary policy, fiscal policy, trade policy, and economic development through analysis and critique of the private market and public policy. Lecture. 3 credits.

20-809-291 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (SOCSCI)
Introduces, describes, and analyzes how markets work emphasizing what they do well and how they fail and how individuals, businesses, and governments choose to use scarce resources. Includes descriptions, analyses, and critiques of various methods of government intervention within the economy. Analyzes business decisions with regard to cost analysis, output determinations, the price system, and resource markets. Analyzes current issues using economic concepts such as income distribution, monopoly, and efficiency. Discusses current topics such as the environment, international markets, and trade. Lecture. 3 credits.

General Education
Social Science Courses

10-809-103 THINK CRITICALLY & CREATIVELY
Provides instruction in the realistic and practical methods of thinking which are in high demand in all occupations today.  Decision making, problem solving, persuasion, creativity, setting goals and objectives are considered in depth as the student applies specific thinking strategies to situations in a wide variety of situations.  Lecture.  3 credits.

10-809-108 HUMAN/CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
Introduces students to tools which geographers use to observe, describe, and analyze the world in which we live, with special emphasis on cultures, people, environments, and regions and their interactions.  Emphasis is on using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in a social science setting.  Lecture.  3 credits.

10-809-166 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS: THEORY AND APPLICATION
Provides a basic understanding of the theoretical foundations of ethical thought. Diverse ethical perspectives will be used to analyze and compare relevant issues. Students will critically evaluate individual, social and/or professional standards of behavior, and apply a systematic decision-making process to these situations. Lecture. 3 credits.

10-809-172 RACE, ETHNIC AND DIVERSITY STUDIES
Draws from several disciplines to reaffirm the basic American values of justice and equality by teaching a basic vocabulary, a history of immigration and conquest, principles of transcultural communication, legal liability and the value of aesthetic production to increase the probability of respectful encounters among people.  In addition to an analysis of majority/minority relations in a multicultural context, the topics of ageism, sexism, gender differences, sexual orientation, the disabled and the American Disability ACT (ADA) are explored. Ethnic relations are studied in global and comparative perspectives. Lecture. 3 credits.

10-809-188 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Study of human development throughout the lifespan. This course explores developmental theory and research with an emphasis on the interactive nature of the biological, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that affect the individual from conception to death. Application activities and critical thinking skills will enable students to gain an increased knowledge and understanding of themselves and others. Lecture. 3 credits.

10-809-192 PERSONAL FINANCE
Introductory course is designed to develop responsible and informed personal financial decision-making. Banking, obtaining and managing credit, creating and following a budget, evaluating risk tolerance, basic investing, and long range financial planning, including retirement, insurance, and basic tax issues, both in theory and in application, are the main focuses on the course. Students will develop a personal financial portfolio including short-term financial plans and long-term financial goals. Lecture. 1 credit.

10-809-195 ECONOMICS
Introduces economic tools for use in business and personal life. Covers markets, economic growth, employment, productivity, computers, and the Internet, international trade, the role of government, and business cycles. Lecture. 3 credits.

10-809-197 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN SOCIETY
Explores the American social and political institutions affecting the individual as a citizen, worker, and participant in various social groups. Topics studied will be flexible and responsive to contemporary issues. Lecture. 3 credits.

10-809-199 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN RELATIONS
Focuses on improving personal and job-related relationships through understanding and applying sound psychological principles. Topics include self-concept, motivation, emotions, stress management, conflict resolution, and human relation processes. Lecture. 3 credits.

31-809-350 CUSTOMER RELATIONS
Focuses on building good working relationships within the professional environment. Case studies and role playing will give students preparation for customer relations work. Lecture. 1 credit.


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